How to Grow Green Grass

Overview

Many homeowners dream of the day when their lawn, after persistent mowing, will turn that lovely shade of green they've seen in magazines. But getting a lush, green grass takes more than mowing. It requires good cultivation practices that promote healthy grass growth, proper fertilization and proper yard-waste management. With consistency, a lawn will heal itself and begin showing the green we always hear is on the other side.

Step 1

Mow your grass at the correct height. The Colorado State University Extension service says grass is best kept at a height of 2.5 to 3 inches tall. Set the height of your mower to appropriately cut the grass. Ensure that the mower blade is sharp to prevent ripping the grass.

Step 2

Cut the grass so that you are removing only one-third of the blade at a time, recommends the University of Missouri Extension service. Grass clippings cut to this length decompose more quickly than a longer blade of cut grass, as 80 to 85 percent of a grass blade is made of water. As such, the cut grass will be less likely to contribute to thatch, the layer of dead plant material that covers the soil of the lawn.

Step 3

Use a mulching mower in the fall to shred leaves into fine pieces so they do not need to be piled and bagged, suggests University of Missouri Extension. Cut several times in different directions to mulch the leaves so that they decompose into the lawn.

Step 4

Fertilize the lawn in the fall or late fall, suggests the Ohio State University Extension office, as doing so decreases the possibility of rapid top growth and disease during the spring and summer. Use a nitrogen-heavy fertilizer, between 10 and 34 weight. Begin to apply fertilizer in the spring, applying every 8 to 10 weeks.

Step 5

Water the lawn during hot parts of the summer so that the lawn gets 1 inch of water, suggests Ohio State University Extension. This wets the grass to a depth of 6 to 8 inches, improving root growth and strengthening the grass.

Things You'll Need

  • Mower
  • Fertilizer
  • Fertilizer spreader
  • Rake
  • Core aerator

References

  • Colorado State University Extension: Lawn Care
  • Ohio State University Extension: Lawn Care Plans
  • University of Missouri Extension: Don't Bag It Lawn Care
Keywords: grow green grass, grass care, lawn maintenence

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.