Flowers for Outdoor Containers

Outdoor containers have a number of uses, from bringing flowers to a porch to acting as a border along a walkway. Outdoor containers can be used to keep vigorous plants from growing out of control, and they can be used for sensitive plants that need to be taken indoors during the cold winter months. There are a variety of flowers that will survive in an outdoor container.

Plumbago

Plumbago (Plumbago auriculata) is a flowering shrub native to South Africa. The plant offers bright green foliage with clusters of blue flowers, in shades ranging from pale sky blue to rich royal blue depending on the cultivar. Plumbago grows well in outdoor containers, overflowing over the edges with its lush foliage. The plant grows best in full sunlight, and in soil that is well drained and slightly acidic. Plumbago is quite drought tolerant once established and requires little watering.

Moss Rose

Low maintenance and drought tolerant, moss rose (Portulaca grandiflora) is a hardy flowering annual that can be left outside in a container and tended to very infrequently. Native to South America, moss rose thrives in full sunlight and soils that are sandy, poor and well drained. The plant boasts semi-succulent, rich green leaves and small flowers in a range of colors, from yellow to orange and red. Moss rose should be watered occasionally to encourage the best possible flowers.

Persian Buttercup

Persian buttercup (Ranunculus asiaticus) is a sprawling perennial that boasts thick, globular flower heads in colors ranging from pink, white, red and yellow depending on the cultivar. The plant is commonly used in borders and as a container plant. Persian buttercup will produce its best flowers if planted in full sunlight, and in soil that is neutral and loamy. The plant should be watered enough to keep the soil consistently moist.

Keywords: outdoor containers, outdoor flowers, flower types

About this Author

Michelle Wishhart is a writer based out of Astoria, Ore. She has been writing professionally for five years, starting with her position as a staff arts writer for an alternative weekly paper in Santa Cruz. She has a B.A. in fine arts from the University of California in Santa Cruz and a minor in English literature.