How to Make Your Own Organic Fertilizer

Overview

When researching how to make your own organic fertilizer, keep the environmental benefits in mind. Opting to make your own organic fertilizer is environmentally friendly because it lacks chemicals and because it cuts down on other energy use; imagine the energy used to create, package and transport pre-made commercial fertilizer. With a do-it-yourself recipe you will have the tools you need to know how to make your own organic fertilizer.

Step 1

Gather your ingredients. To make your own organic fertilizer, you will need four parts seed meal, one-quarter part agricultural lime (finely ground is ideal), one-quarter part gypsum, and one-half part dolomitic lime, according to the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County.

Step 2

Identify ingredients in your organic fertilizer recipe that can be swapped out with other effective choices. Instead of using seed meal, you can use grass clippings that are untouched by chemicals. The Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County explains that though plant growth may not be as vigorous with grass as it is with seed meal, grass is effective and less expensive. In place of seed meal, use grass clippings at an approximate measurement of "six to seven 5-gallon buckets for every 100 square feet." Instead of using one-quarter part gypsum, you can simply use twice the amount of agricultural lime.

Step 3

Use additionally recommended ingredients when you make your own organic fertilizer. According to the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County, using one part of one of the following results in even more effective fertilizer: bone meal, rock phosphate or high-phosphate guano. Consider using one part basalt dust or one part kelp meal in addition to the necessary ingredients.

Step 4

Combine all ingredients of the recipe to make your own organic fertilizer until thoroughly mixed; take a visual inspection to be sure all parts have been evenly spread through the fertilizer mixture. If you choose to use grass clippings, use a hoe to chop the clippings into the surface of your soil to a depth of 2 inches, as suggested by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County.

Things You'll Need

  • Seed meal or grass clippings
  • Agricultural lime
  • Gypsum
  • Dolomitic lime
  • Bone meal, rock phosphate or high-phosphate guano (optional)
  • Kelp meal or basalt dust (optional)
  • 5-gallon bucket
  • Gardening hoe
  • Gardening gloves

References

  • Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County: The Quick and Easy Guide to Fertilizer
Keywords: make organic fertilizer, organic fertilizer ingredients, organic fertilizer recipe

About this Author

Tarah Damask's writing career, beginning in 2003, includes experience as a fashion writer/editor for Neiman Marcus, short fiction publications in "North Texas Review," a self-published novel, band biographies, charter school curriculum, and articles for eHow. She has a love for words and is an avid observer. Damask holds a Master of Arts in English and creative writing from the University of North Texas.