How to Water Grape Plants

Overview

Backyard gardeners have dozens of grape cultivars they can choose to grow, each with its own flavors and growth characteristics, according to Oregon State University. Whatever your chosen grape variety, provide the grape plant with the water it needs to grow lush foliage and juicy fruit. A drought-stressed vine will quickly languish, wilt and drop its flowers and fruit.

Step 1

Create a soil ring around the base of each grape plant. Build the ring approximately 6 inches high and 2 feet across.

Step 2

Fill the soil ring with water every two to three weeks, according to the University of California. Fill the ring with enough water to moisten the soil to a depth of 10 inches during the grape vine's first year of growth, according to Oklahoma State University. The specific amount of water needed to accomplish this varies widely according to your soil type and soil density.

Step 3

Increase the amount of water used after the vine's first year. Use enough water to moisten the soil to a depth of 1 foot, according to Oklahoma State University. Continue following a watering interval of two to three weeks.

Tips and Warnings

  • Avoid getting water on the grape plant itself when the vine is producing fruit, according to Oregon State University. This can promote fruit rot. Instead, apply water directly to the plant's base.

Things You'll Need

  • Spade
  • Soil
  • Water

References

  • "The Backyard Vintner: An Enthusiast's Guide to Growing Grapes and Making Wine at Home"; Jim Law; 2005
  • University of California: Watering Grapes
  • Oklahoma State University: Growing Grapes in the Home Garden
  • Oregon State University: Growing Grapes in Your Home Garden

Who Can Help

  • WineMaker Magazine: Growing Grapes
Keywords: growing grape plants, watering grape plants, grape water needs

About this Author

Josh Duvauchelle is an editor and journalist with more than 10 years' experience. His work has appeared in various magazines, including "Honolulu Magazine," which has more paid subscribers than any other magazine in Hawaii. He graduated with honors from Trinity Western University, holding a Bachelor of Arts in professional communications, and earned a certificate in applied leadership and public affairs from the Laurentian Leadership Centre.