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How to Take Care of Mandeville Flowers

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How to Take Care of Mandeville Flowers

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Overview

Mandeville, also called mandevilla, is a tropical vine with large flowers that has become popular with gardeners in USDA zones 9 to 11. In zone 8, mandeville vine may die back from frost but will re-emerge and grow the following spring. Mandeville vines have fragrant flowers growing in clusters that bloom heavily during the summer but sporadically over the winter. A fast-growing vine, the mandeville is often used as screening.

Keep Them Blooming

Step 1

Plant your mandeville vine in a sunny to partial shade location with well-draining, rich loamy soil. Mandeville will flower best in full sun but in hot climates needs midday shade. If temperatures fall below 65 degrees F, your mandeville will slow its production of flowers.

Step 2

Check the soil moisture every few days. Mandevilles love well-draining soil, are sensitive to overwatering and need to have the soil dry out between watering.

Step 3

Water your mandeville vine slowly to ensure that the soil becomes evenly saturated.

Step 4

Fertilize your mandeville vine every two weeks during the blooming season of summer, using an all-purpose fertilizer. Producing flowers takes a lot of energy from a plant, so feeding your mandeville will promote the continuation of bud and flower formation.

Things You'll Need

  • All-purpose 10-20-10 fertilizer

References

  • Floridata.com: Mandevilla
  • Garden-Services.com: Mandevilla
  • Plant-Care.com: Mandevilla Care
Keywords: keep mandeville flowering, mandevilla vine flowers, flowers of mandeville

About this Author

At home in rural California, Kate Carpenter has been writing articles and web content for several well known marketeers since 2007. With a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Kansas and A Master of Education equivalent from the University of Northern Colorado, Carpenter brings a wealth of diverse experience to her writing.