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How to Trim a Bird of Paradise Tree

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How to Trim a Bird of Paradise Tree

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Overview

The bird of paradise (Strelitzia reginae) plant originally hails from South Africa but is now raised throughout North America in USDA hardiness zones 9B or higher. Sometimes, gardeners refer to the shrub as a tree because it can reach a height of up to 15 feet, according to the University of Hawaii. Though regular pruning isn't needed in the traditional sense, occasionally trimming to remove dead foliage and old flower stems can help to keep your bird of paradise looking lush.

Step 1

Identify dead flower stalks. Such stalks emerge from the center of the bird of paradise plant and turn brown after the blossom at the top as died. Cut them back as close to the base of the plant as possible.

Step 2

Remove dead and wilted foliage. Trim the leaf at a point that's as low on its stem as possible.

Step 3

Prune back side shoots, which often appear along the edges of mature bird of paradise plants. These side shoots will grow into a new bird of paradise specimen and should be trimmed back if you don't want your plant to expand outward in size. Cut the shoot off at its base to kill it.

Step 4

Collect all of the foliage and stems that you've removed and throw them away. Alternatively, shred or chop the trimmed plant parts into small, inch-long pieces and add them to your compost pile.

Things You'll Need

  • Pruning shears

References

  • "Tropical Flowering Plants"; Kirsten Albrecht Llamas; 2003
  • University of Florida: Bird-of-Paradise
  • University of Hawaii: Bird-of-Paradise
Keywords: bird of paradise, trim perennial flower, trim Strelitzia reginae

About this Author

Josh Duvauchelle is an editor and journalist with more than 10 years' experience. His work has appeared in various magazines, including "Honolulu Magazine," which has more paid subscribers than any other magazine in Hawaii. He graduated with honors from Trinity Western University, holding a Bachelor of Arts in professional communications, and earned a certificate in applied leadership and public affairs from the Laurentian Leadership Centre.