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How to Grow a New Rose Bush From a Cutting

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How to Grow a New Rose Bush From a Cutting

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Overview

The ideal place to take a cutting from a rose bush is at a stem, with a withering flower attached to its tip. Cut the flower head from the stem, making the cut just above the first set of healthy leaves. From this point, cut about 6 to 8 inches of the stem from the bush and remove all but the top two five-leaf-leaflets from the cutting. Cut at 45-degree angles, and always use a sanitized sharp knife or gardening shears. If properly tended, the cutting will become a new rose bush.

Step 1

Dip the base end of the cutting into water and then into rooting powder.

Step 2

Fill a 6-inch pot with equal amounts coarse sand and vermiculite. Instead of vermiculite, you can use peat moss or perlite.

Step 3

Plant the base end of the cutting in the soil, about 2 inches deep. Pat the soil down to hold in place. Plant one to six cuttings in one container.

Step 4

Water the pot with about two cups of water. Allow the water to drain from the pot.

Step 5

Place a large, clear plastic bag around the pot, to create a greenhouse, and hold the other end under the bottom of the pot. This will keep the soil moist while the roots develop.

Step 6

Set in a sunny area, yet not in the direct sunlight. After about six or eight weeks, when new leaves develop, remove the plastic bag from the pot.

Step 7

Replant each cutting in its own 3-inch peat pot. Water thoroughly and cover each with a plastic food bag to create a greenhouse. In about three weeks, the new rosebush will be ready for planting in the garden.

Things You'll Need

  • Rose cutting
  • Rooting powder
  • 6-inch pot
  • Coarse sand
  • Vermiculite, peat moss or perlite
  • 2 plastic bags
  • Peat pot

References

  • "Roses"; James Crockett; 1974
  • Texas A&M University: Rose Propagation From Cuttings
Keywords: rose cuttings, rooting rose cuttings, planting rose cuttings

About this Author

Ann Johnson has been a freelance writer since 1995. She previously served as the editor of a community magazine in Southern California and was also an active real estate agent, specializing in commercial and residential properties. She has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from California State University of Fullerton.

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