How to Take Care of a Creeping Jew Plant

Overview

Creeping Jew plants (Tradescantia spp.) are popular as groundcovers or in hanging baskets because of their spreading or trailing habit. This plant, also called the wandering Jew, features succulent stems and interesting foliage that can be variegated, bright green or even purple in color, depending on the species. T. fluminensis is known as the "green" creeping Jew, while T. zebrina has leaves striped with creamy white streaks on top and bright violet undersides. Attractive and hardy, this plant is popular with indoor and outdoor home gardeners.

Step 1

Place the plant where it will receive some bright light, but not direct sunlight. Place indoor plants by a sunny, south-facing window.

Step 2

Provide soil that is continually moist and rich in organic materials. Cover the soil with a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and limit weed growth.

Step 3

Water the soil often enough so that it remains moist but not waterlogged or muddy. Empty the tray of container plants as soon as the pot stops draining.

Step 4

Feed the creeping Jew plant with a 20-10-20 fertilizer every two months. Follow the label instructions for fertilizer dosage.

Step 5

Keep indoor temperatures consistently in the low or mid 70s F. Keep the plant away from cold or hot drafts, such as those from heating or air-conditioning vents.

Tips and Warnings

  • Too much watering will cause the creeping Jew plant's roots to rot.

Things You'll Need

  • Watering tool
  • Rich, loamy soil
  • Mulch
  • 20-10-20 fertilizer

References

  • Floridata:Tradescantia fluminensis
  • Desert Tropicals: Wandering Jew
  • Floridata: Tradescantia zebrinaca
Keywords: Tradescantia zebrina care, creeping Jew plant, growing wandering Jew

About this Author

April Sanders has been a professional writer since 1998. Previously, she worked as an educator and currently writes academic research content for EBSCO publishing and elementary reading curriculum for Compass Publishing. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in social psychology from the University of Washington and a master's degree in information sciences and technology in education from Mansfield University.