How to Prepare Wild Rose Hips

Overview

Wild roses bear fruit known as rose hips. According to albertarose.com, these rose hips contain such a high amount of vitamin C that during World War II, the British used rose hip tea to fight off a deficiency of this vitamin. Look for the hardened seed case, also known as the wild rose hip, to appear in autumn after the rose blooms fade and drop. Gather these for drying and preparing into wild rose hip juice and for making a tea.

Harvest, Dry and Make Tea

Step 1

Pick the round, red seed cases from wild roses never treated with pesticides or herbicides.

Step 2

Pull off the stems and the tails with your fingers.

Step 3

Arrange the rose hips in a single layer in the bottom of a cardboard box, and lay it outside in the sun to dry for two weeks. Store the dried rose hips in an airtight container until ready to use.

Step 4

Boil 1 cup of water in a kettle and place 2 tsp. of dried rose hips into a mug.

Step 5

Pour the water over the rose hips and allow to steep for 5 to 10 minutes. Remove the rose hips from the tea and enjoy with a sweetener of your choice.

Make Wild Rose Hip Juice

Step 1

Place 1 pound of wild rose hips in a saucepan, and cover with water.

Step 2

Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat.

Step 3

Lower the heat to medium-low until the mixture simmers. Cover and cook for 15 minutes.

Step 4

Place a cheesecloth-lined colander over a bowl, and pour the rose hip juice through the colander.

Step 5

Discard the rose hips from the cheesecloth, and pour the juice into a resealable jar. Store the jar of rose hip juice (syrup) in the refrigerator for up to one week. Use in recipes for an addition of vitamin C without altering the flavor of the dish.

Things You'll Need

  • Wild rose hips
  • Cardboard box
  • Air tight container
  • Water
  • Saucepan
  • Mug
  • Sweetener of your choice (optional)
  • Colander
  • Bowl
  • Cheesecloth
  • Resealable jar

References

  • Alberta Rose: Wild Rose Hips
  • Colorado State Forest Service: Fruits of Your Labor Cookbook
  • University of Minnesota: Using Minnesota's Wild Fruits
Keywords: rose hip juice, wild rose hips, prepare rose hips

About this Author

Athena Hessong began her freelance writing career in 2004. She draws upon experiences and knowledge gained from teaching all high school subjects for seven years. Hessong earned a Bachelor's in Arts in history from the University of Houston and is a current member of the Society of Professional Journalists.