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How to Ripen Asian Pears

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How to Ripen Asian Pears

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Overview

Asian pears taste like a cross between an apple and pear and differ in their harvesting from European pears. According to Clemson University, Asian pears ripen fully on the tree before harvesting, unlike European pears, which are picked green and ripened at room temperature. The Centers for Disease Control's Fruit and Veggies Matter page notes that Asian pears have a firm texture when fully ripe and do not soften like European pears. For those who pick Asian pears when they're still hard, Purdue University notes that the fruit will soften after two weeks when stored at 70 degrees F.

Step 1

Wait for the Asian pears to ripen fully on the tree by looking for a change in color, from green to either yellow or brown. Check for maturity by gently twisting a fruit. Taste any Asian pears that easily separate from the branch when twisted.

Step 2

Harvest the rest of the fruit from the tree when the Asian pear tastes sweet and juicy. Purdue University notes that most growers use the color and sweetness of the fruit to determine when it's ready for harvest.

Step 3

Soften (ripen) the Asian pears by storing them at room temperature for two weeks or in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to four weeks.

Step 4

Discard any spongy-textured Asian pears or those with shriveled or wrinkled skin.

References

  • CDC: Fruit and Veggies Matter: Asian Pear
  • Clemson University: Asian Pears
  • Chow: Ingredients - Asian Pear
  • Pick Your Own: Picking Pears Tips
  • Purdue University: Asian Pears - Harvest and Maturity

Who Can Help

  • Chow: Asian Pear Recipes
Keywords: eat asian pear, ripen asian pear, apple pear

About this Author

Athena Hessong began her freelance writing career in 2004. She draws upon experiences and knowledge gained from teaching all high school subjects for seven years. Hessong earned a Bachelor's in Arts in history from the University of Houston and is a current member of the Society of Professional Journalists.

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