How to Water Sweet Bell Pepper Plants

Overview

Sweet bell peppers are one of the more versatile pepper varieties grown in the home garden. Producing an abundant harvest of large fruit on a single plant, the peppers are then usable raw in salads or cooked in a variety of dishes. Sweet bells are also canned in relishes and chutneys for use throughout the year. Peppers are a warm season vegetable, but during the hot, dry days of summer watering is of utmost importance as they aren't drought tolerant. Proper watering ensures the sweet peppers develop to their full size and that the plants produce crisp, ripe peppers.

Step 1

Water the pepper plants immediately after transplanting into the garden bed, soaking the soil until it feels moist to a six-inch depth. This collapses any air pockets around the roots from planting, allowing the sweet peppers to immediately begin absorbing moisture and nutrients from the soil.

Step 2

Lay a two-inch layer of organic mulch over the pepper bed. Mulch preserves soil moisture and prevents the soil from drying out completely during hot, dry weather.

Step 3

Water peppers once a week through most of the garden season, or twice a week during dry or hot weather. Water the peppers at the base of the plant, and avoid wetting the foliage or fruit, as this can make the peppers susceptible to fungal infections. Water until the soil feels moist to a six-inch depth.

Step 4

Irrigate container-grown peppers daily, and more often if the soil dries out during hot weather. Water the plants from the top until the excess moisture begins draining out the bottom of the containers.

Tips and Warnings

  • The frequent watering necessary for container-grown peppers rinses nutrients out of the soil quickly and may stunt the sweet peppers' growth. Use a weekly fertilizer regimen to counteract this.

Things You'll Need

  • Mulch
  • Spade

References

  • University of Illinois Extension: Peppers
  • Iowa State University Extension: Peppers
Keywords: watering bell peppers, sweet bell peppers, irrigating vegetable gardens

About this Author

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications, including the "Dollar Stretcher." Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.