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How to Make Lucky Bamboo Grow Big

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How to Make Lucky Bamboo Grow Big

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Overview

Lucky bamboo is, in fact, not a bamboo. It is a form of a water lily, and as such, it grows best underwater with the roots in sand or dirt at the bottom of the container. Lucky bamboo grows best in shade but also in warmer locations. Be aware that lucky bamboo stalks do not grow very much; you can encourage larger leaves but you won't have much success with height on the canes. With proper care and feeding, encouraging your lucky bamboo to grow larger leaves is not difficult.

Step 1

Place your lucky bamboo in a location close to the ceiling. Heat rises, and lucky bamboo grows better in warmer locations.

Step 2

Change your lucky bamboo water every three to four weeks. When you change the water, rinse the roots under running water to remove any buildup that could interfere with nutrient uptake.

Step 3

Make sure your lucky bamboo is in a large enough container to allow the roots to grow. If your container becomes too small, transplant your lucky bamboo in a larger one.

Step 4

Feed your lucky bamboo either with a food optimized for lucky bamboo or with 1/2 strength African violet food. Feed your bamboo as often as indicated on the fertilizer packaging.

Things You'll Need

  • Lucky bamboo
  • Liquid plant fertilizer

References

  • Lucky Bamboo Garden: FAQs
  • Sidwell Friends School: A Study of Anemotropism, Nutrient Absorption, and Photosynthesis in a Species of the Genus Dracaena
Keywords: lucky bamboo cultivation, lucky bamboo care, lucky bamboo indoors

About this Author

Although he grew up in Latin America, Mr. Ma is a writer based in Denver. He has been writing since 1987 and has written for NPR, AP, Boeing, Ford New Holland, Microsoft, RAHCO International, Umax Data Systems and other manufacturers in Taiwan. He studied creative writing at Mankato State University in Minnesota. He speaks fluent Mandarin Chinese, English and reads Spanish.