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How to Clean Dusty Dried Flowers

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How to Clean Dusty Dried Flowers

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Overview

Dried flower arrangements and wreaths can be a tasteful addition to your home's decor. Professional florists can assist you in creating the perfect arrangement, or you can try your own hand at flower arranging to create a piece for your home. Although dried flowers can be a good alternative to the expense of frequently having to replace fresh flowers, remember that they aren't intended to be permanent. A good dried floral arrangement should last between three and five years if properly maintained.

Step 1

Take any dried flower arrangements in need of dusting or cleaning and place them outdoors on a table or other solid surface. It's best to clean dried flowers outdoors to prevent the dust build-up from simply being relocated to another part of your home.

Step 2

Plug in your hair dryer close enough to where you have set your dried flowers so that you will be able to easily reach them.

Step 3

Hold the hair dryer in your hand about 10 inches from the flowers.

Step 4

Turn the hair dryer on the lowest setting and direct the air toward the plant, which will blow off any of the dust that has accumulated. You may need to use your free hand to gently move the dried plant's stems and flowers to be sure all the dust and dirt is removed.

Step 5

Repeat steps 3 and 4 with your remaining dried flower arrangements.

Things You'll Need

  • Hair dryer

References

  • Dried Flowers Direct: Dried Wreath Care
  • Flower Shop Network: Dried Flowers
Keywords: cleaning dried flowers, dusting dried flowers, dried flower maintenance

About this Author

Meghan McMahon lives in the Chicago suburbs, where she spent six years as a newspaper journalist before becoming a part-time freelance writer and editor and full-time mother. She received a bachelor's degree in journalism from Eastern Illinois University in 2000 and has written for "The Daily Southtown" and "The Naperville Sun" in suburban Chicago.