What Flowers Are Native to Mexico?

From cool mountain ranges to the arid climate of the Sonoran desert, Mexico boasts a range of climates that promote flourishing plant growth. Mexico is home to a number of unique flowering plants. Many of the country's native plants can be grown as ornamental flowers throughout the world.

Mexican Sunflower

Native to Central America and Mexico, Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundiflora) is a bushy annual that produces striking orange, daisy like flowers complemented by rich green foliage. Highly attractive to butterflies, Mexican Sunflower is a popular ornamental plant thanks to its high drought and heat tolerance. If planted early in a warm location, the plant will often produce flowers twice. Mexican Sunflowers should be grown in well-drained soil in full sunlight, although they will tolerate a little shade.


Native to Mexico, Central America and Colombia, the Dahlia genus contains a number of stunning flower species. The Dahlia is the national flower of Mexico. Dahlia flowers boast thick, layered flower heads in a range of brilliant colors. The sun loving plant should be planted in a sunny location with well drained, slightly acidic soil. Soil should be kept moist, but not overly soggy. Gardeners growing Dahlias in warm climates with mild winters can leave Dahlia tubers in the ground for a second year of blooms.

Mexican Zinnia

Mexican Zinnia (Zinnia haageana) is an annual flowering plant native to Mexico. Similar in appearance to the common Zinnia, Mexican Zinnias boast bushy green foliage and daisy like flowers. The plant is frequently used in annual beds, as the flower is generally low growing, reaching a maximum height of about two feet. Mexican Zinnias are popular for their high drought and heat tolerance. The flowers can survive through brutally hot summers with ease. Mexican Zinnias should be grown in well drained soils.

Keywords: Mexican flowers, Mexico plants, flower types

About this Author

Michelle Wishhart is a writer based out of Astoria, Ore. She has been writing professionally for five years, starting with her position as a staff arts writer for an alternative weekly paper in Santa Cruz. She has a B.A. in fine arts from the University of California in Santa Cruz and a minor in English literature.