What Is Meyer Zoysia Grass?


Meyer zoysia grass is a slow-growing turfgrass that has a deep green color. It is a warm season grass that is a strain of Zoysia japonica. Meyer zoysia grass is much more tolerant of cold than the majority of other zoysia grasses. The name of the grass combines Karl von Zois, the Austrian botanist, with Frank N. Meyer, who worked for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).


Meyer zoysia grass is classified as a premium lawn grass and is commonly grown on both commercial and residential lawns. It is also often used in golf course fairways and tees. This type of grass is particularly advantageous for golf courses, due to its low need for water and mowing, and high tolerance to cold.


Meyer zoysia grass offers various benefits. Its dense turf can protect against weed invasion. It is highly resistant against many (but not all) diseases and pests. It has a good tolerance to salt, shade, wear and cold, and it can also handle close mowing.


Although Meyer zoysia grass is highly resistant to most insects and diseases, there are some possible problems. One of the most serious problems that could affect Meyer zoysia grass is called brown patch (rhizoctonia fungus). Other potential problems include bill bugs, grubs, moles, crickets and leaf rust.


Meyer zoysia grass is generally a rich green shade. During the winter months, however, the grass develops into a pleasant, warm, golden-brown color. It produces a thick, dense mat that is capable of driving out problematic weeds. The grass has a medium blade texture.


Meyer zoysia grass thrives when grown in full sun. It can grow successfully in minimal shade but avoid growing it in an area with abundant shade. It is drought tolerant.

Keywords: zoysiagrass, Meyers Zoysia grass, Zoysia japonica

About this Author

Isabel Prontes is a freelance writer and traveler residing in Manhattan, NY. She has traveled to five continents and counting. Her work has appeared on a number of websites, such as Travels, eHow.com and "Happy Living Magazine." Prontes has a professional background in public relations; she received a bachelor's degree in communication studies from Pace University.