How to Replace a John Deere Riding Mower Deck Belt

Overview

Riding mowers require a regular set of maintenance including air filter changes, oil and oil filter changes, and lubrication. After several hundred hours of use, the belts that run the blades on your mower will wear down and require replacement. Shaking on the mower deck, uneven grass cutting or signs of dryness, cracking or splitting are all indications that the mower deck belts require replacement.

Step 1

Disengage the mower and remove the cabling from the spark plug to the engine. This will keep the mower from starting accidentally. Move the mower onto a flat surface and engage the parking brake.

Step 2

Move the mower deck down to the lowest position and disconnect the lift rod assembly from the front of the deck, as well as the tension rods from the sides of the mower deck. Roll the mower deck out from under the riding mower.

Step 3

Remove the screws from the belt protection cover, lift the cover off and place it to the side.

Step 4

Clean the mower deck of any grass or debris before removing the mower deck belts.

Step 5

Examine the sticker on the mower deck for the correct position of the belt before removing it.

Step 6

Remove the belt from the mower, pulling up on the front pulley at the front of the mower deck, to remove the belt. Replace with the new belt in the routing configuration on the mower deck sticker or in the owner's manual.

Step 7

Reinstall the cover of the mower deck and hook the deck up to the mower in the opposite order of removal.

Things You'll Need

  • Socket wrench
  • Work gloves
  • Safety goggles
  • Screwdriver
  • Belt

References

  • Scotts Garden Tractor: Operator's Manual (PDF)
  • John Deere: Service Mower
Keywords: John Deere, mower deck belt, replace mower belt

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.