• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How to Plant English Peas & Carrots

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How to Plant English Peas & Carrots

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

English peas are also known as garden peas. They are one of three general types of peas, the others being sugar snap peas and snow peas. English peas and carrots are often the first cooking vegetables that you harvest from your garden each spring, beating out garden staples like tomato and broccoli. Carrots and peas are planted early in the season, and they enjoy the early cool spring days for doing most of their growing.

English Peas

Step 1

Plant English peas early in the spring as soon as the soil can be worked. Dig your garden patch down about 12 inches and mix in a 4-inch layer of compost.

Step 2

Plant peas about 1 inch deep and in a double row. Place two seeds next to each other, then another two seeds about 10 inches farther along the row, and so on.

Step 3

Push dead branches into the soil near where the seeds have been planted. These branches are known as "pea brush," and the pea vines will grow up them instead of sprawling on the ground.

Step 4

Water the peas after the pea brush is safely installed, soaking the ground around the seeds.

Carrots

Step 1

Dig the soil where carrots will grow very carefully. Any rocks or clumps in the soil can distort or deform a smooth carrot shape, so make sure that your bed is rock-free.

Step 2

Mix in a 4-inch layer of compost with the soil for fertilization. Add a thin layer of wood ashes to the garden bed to add potassium to the soil, which will make your carrots taste sweeter.

Step 3

Run your finger or a pencil along the garden row to make a furrow for planting the seeds. Make the furrows about 1/4 inch deep.

Step 4

Sprinkle peat moss or sifted compost into the bottom of the furrow, almost filling it. Plant the seeds on top of the peat moss, with about 3 seeds per inch. Sprinkle another 1/2-inch layer of peat moss on top of the seeds. Water the seed bed gently but thoroughly.

Tips and Warnings

  • Carrots take longer to mature than peas. To eat the vegetables together, harvest the carrots as "baby" carrots.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Rake
  • Compost
  • Pea seeds
  • Carrot seeds

References

  • University of Illinois Extension: Peas
  • National Gardening Association: Carrot
  • Colorado State University: Perfect Pea Planning Promises Prime Patch
  • Purdue University Extension: Plant Peas Early

Who Can Help

  • Farmers' Almanac: Average Frost Dates
Keywords: grow peas carrots, pea carrot garden, early spring vegetables

About this Author

Anne Baley is a writer and photographer living in Southeast Michigan. She has written dozens of articles about places she has discovered while traveling throughout the United States. Baley's work has appeared in a variety of online outlets, including EndlessSunday, GardenGuides and Travels.