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How to Fertilize Fescue Before Winter

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How to Fertilize Fescue Before Winter

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Overview

Tall fescue is a cool season turf grass that grows throughout the year, even in the cold winter months. Fescue turns green early in the spring and is adaptable to a variety of environments, including sunny and shady, wet or dry. Fescue is considered a weed if left to grow wild, but if cared for correctly, it makes a nice grass for a lawn. Fertilization before the winter will make fescue grow during the winter, ensuring a lush lawn in the spring.

Step 1

Apply your fertilizer in late September using a fertilizer spreader with granular fertilizer. A fertilizer high in nitrogen will promote growth throughout the winter, and help the fescue turn green in the spring.

Step 2

Apply lime to the lawn once every other year to improve soil pH and encourage fescue growth. Apply the lime with the fertilizer at a ratio of 20 pounds of lime per 1,000 square feet of lawn. Have the lawn pH tested by a university extension if you believe the lawn needs more lime.

Step 3

Water the lawn thoroughly to sink the fertilizer into the soil and prevent over winter drought. Water the fescue until the first frost of the winter.

Things You'll Need

  • Slow release granule fertilizer
  • Spreader
  • Lime

References

  • University of Missouri Extension: Tall Fescue
  • Walter Reeves: Fescue
  • Kansas State University: Tall Fescue Grass
Keywords: fertilize fescue, winter fertilization fescue, fescue grass fertilization

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.