Facts About Aurora Flowers

In Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn. By association, the flowers and plants that have an "aurora" designation share the qualities of beauty and brightness that define their namesake. Most aurora flowers bloom during the spring, which symbolizes a new dawn.

Cornus Rutban Aurora

The Stellar dogwood named Cornus 'Rutban' aurora is a cross between Cornus florida and Cornus kousa. It is the creation of Dr. Elwin Orton who developed a highly successful hybrid series as part of Rutgers University's breeding program. The abundant white blooms of the Cornus aurora tend to cover the foliage like a blanket. The rounded and large bracts of the flower heads create an effect like snow. These beautiful flowers usually bloom in late spring. Cornus aurora is a deciduous tree. It prefers full sun, and grows to a height of about 30 feet, spreading outward to between 18 and 20 feet. Cornus aurora is a 1993 Gold Medal Winner of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, indicating the the plant will "exhibit standards of excellence for pest and disease resistance as well as ease of growing."

Fritillaria Imperialis Aurora

Fritillaria imperialis aurora is native to the Himalayas. Its common name is crown imperial, but contrary to what that might suggest, this plant is unassuming in its ability to grow easily in a range of soil conditions--although it has an imposing and graceful appearance. In the spring, Fritillaria imperialis aurora exhibits bright orange, bell-shaped flowers on tall stems. It is a member of the Liliaceae family.

Viburnum Carlesii Aurora

Viburnum carlesii aurora, also called Korean spice viburnum, features large clusters of pink to white flowers that usually bloom in the spring and fill the air with fragrance. The flowers are the shape of star-like domes. The leaves of this shrub plant turn to red in the fall, enhancing the landscape. This deciduous plant can grow to a height between 5 and 8 feet.

Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart Aurora

Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart aurora (Dicentra formosa) is also called Pacific Bleeding Heart, Wild Bleeding Heart and Western Bleeding Heart, and is native to North America. It is a cultivar with bell-shaped flowers that bloom in the spring. "Luxuriant" is the same basic plant, only with pink flowers. The Dicentra genus produces some of America's and the world's most admired blooms. They are members of the Fumariaceae family. Dicentra spectablis, for example is native to Japan, with springtime blooms that look like small hearts.

Keywords: Aurora flower facts, Cornus Rutban Aurora, Fritillaria Imperialis Aurora

About this Author

Based in Northern California, Maureen Katemopoulos has been a freelance writer for more than 25 years. Her articles on travel, the arts, cuisine and history have appeared in publications such as "Stanislaus Magazine," "Orientations," "The Asia Magazine" and "The Peninsula Group Magazine." She holds a Baccalaureate degree in journalism from Stanford University.