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How to Grow Grapevines in a Pot

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How to Grow Grapevines in a Pot

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Overview

Well-tended grapevines can grow just about anywhere as long as they have adequate protection from the cold. Growing grapevines in a pot is convenient as potted plants can easily be transported during cold weather and keep your plant a manageable size. Though vines generally go dormant in winter months, they will produce fruit throughout the growing season. Take the time to prune your potted grapevine at the end of each summer to make room for new growth.

Step 1

Fill a medium container two-thirds full with 50 percent potting soil and 50 percent perlite. Be sure the container provides enough room for the roots to spread out and has holes for drainage.

Step 2

Create a small indention in the middle of the soil with your hand and place your grapevine in the center. Cover the roots with no more than 2 inches of soil, and use your hand to firmly pat down the dirt around the base in order to eliminate air pockets.

Step 3

Pour water over your grapevine until water runs out of the bottom of the pot. Continue to water your grapevine every two or three days without allowing any standing water.

Step 4

Push a wooden stake into the soil, taking care not to damage any of the roots. Stakes should be buried at least 6 inches below the soil's surface.

Step 5

Encourage upward growth by using twist ties to secure vines to the stake. Be sure to tie vines loosely and adjust as the grapevine grows.

Step 6

Place the pot near a window that receives eight or more hours of sunlight a day. Regularly turn your pot so that all sides of your plant receive equal exposure to sunlight.

Step 7

Prune your grapevine at the start of winter by removing any lower shoots or leaves that emerge and encouraging growth only on the uppermost part of the vine. This will shape your grapevine into a tree which provides maximum fruit production.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not use a dark-colored container as this may heat the roots and damage your grapevines. It may take several years for your plants to grow large enough to produce fruit. Always bring your grapevine inside to protect against freezing temperatures.

Things You'll Need

  • Container
  • Potting soil
  • Perlite
  • Water
  • Wooden stake
  • Twist ties

References

  • Weekend Gardener: Growing Grapes in Pots
  • Ohio State University: Grapevines
  • University of Minnesota: Grapevines
Keywords: growing grapes, grape plants, grapevines in pot

About this Author

Kelsey Erin Shipman has worked as a travel writer, poet, journalist and award-winning photographer since 2004. Her work has appeared in various newspapers, magazines and journals. Shipman has also authored three collections of poetry: "Cold Days," "Bastante" and "Short Poems." She earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Southwestern University.

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