How to Grow Celestial Fig Trees

Overview

Celestial fig trees produce sweet, juicy fruit that is often used in preserves, tarts, jams and pastries. They grow best in warm, southern climate, though have been known to survive single digit temperatures. A single tree can reach 30 feet tall and produce fruit for decades. Unlike their darker cousins, celestial figs remain green up until the day they are ready to be picked. Their red flesh is speckled with seeds and delicious when eaten raw.

Step 1

Plant your celestial fig tree in a location with eight or more hours of sunlight a day and well-draining soil. Though fig trees will grow in a wider range, the preferred soil pH for a celestial fig tree is between 6 and 6.5.

Step 2

Spread a 1- to 2-inch layer of mulch at the base of the tree. Leave a 6-inch radius of space around the trunk to prevent choking of the tree.

Step 3

Mix in manure and/or compost to the top 2 inches of soil and reapply up to three times during the early to middle part of the growing season. Be sure not to fertilize too close to winter as new growth will not have time to harden and will be susceptible to cold.

Step 4

Water your fig tree deeply every 10 days with a slow-drip hose. Dryer climates may necessitate more frequent watering, depending on the amount of rainfall.

Step 5

Keep the area around your celestial fig tree free of weeds. Regularly pull any unwanted plants and replenish mulch to keep weeds from growing.

Step 6

Prune your celestial fig into a low crown for easy access to fruit. Regular pruning is crucial in the first few years when training your tree into a desired shape. Use sharp, clean pruning shears to minimize the risk of disease or injury.

Tips and Warnings

  • Avoid fertilizers high in nitrogen as they can cause fruit to split.

Things You'll Need

  • Manure
  • Compost
  • Water
  • Pruning shears
  • Slow drip hose

References

  • California Rare Fruit Growers: Figs
  • North America Fruit Explorers: The Fig Page
  • Plant Answers: Garden Column
Keywords: celestial fig, grow figs, fig trees

About this Author

Kelsey Erin Shipman has worked as a travel writer, poet, journalist and award-winning photographer since 2004. Her work has appeared in various newspapers, magazines and journals. Shipman has also authored three collections of poetry: "Cold Days," "Bastante" and "Short Poems." She earned a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Southwestern University.