How to Plant an Almond Tree in Utah

Overview

The almond tree (Prunus dulcis) is native to the Mediterranean. The trees have been widely cultivated throughout Pakistan, Syria and Turkey. These climates' similarities to the state of Utah appears to aid in the almond trees' growth in that state. Utah is not prone to early spring frosts so the trees do well because they tend to bear early blossoms. If the blossoms are not touched by spring frosts, the nut harvest will be full and rewarding. Planting almond trees in the state is quite easy.

Step 1

Plant almond trees in deep, well-drained soil that is free of excessive salts and located in full sun. Mix organic matter such as peat moss or aged manure at a ratio of 50 percent organic matter mixed with 50 percent garden soil. Two almond trees much be planted in order for pollination to occur. Plant the trees in January or February.

Step 2

Dig the hole twice as large as the root ball of the tree that is to be planted. The tree should sit comfortably in the hole with the bud union above the soil line. Do not plant the bulb union below the soil surface.

Step 3

Firm the soil completely around the tree's root system. Make sure that there are no air pockets between the almond tree's roots and the soil. Be gentle when firming the soil because almond tree roots are fragile and can be easily damaged by stomping with a foot or other excessive force to compact the soil.

Step 4

Water around the base of the almond tree completely. Apply 2 to 3 inches of mulch to keep back weed growth and help the soil maintain moisture. Keep the roots of young almond trees moist throughout the growing season.

Step 5

Fertilize the almond tree when there is at least 6 inches of new growth. Sprinkle 4 ounces of nitrogen 18 inches from the trees trunk. Water the fertilizer completely into the soil. Fertilize the tree three more times during the summer months and early fall.

Things You'll Need

  • Organic matter such as peat moss or aged manure
  • Shovel
  • Mulch such as peat moss or bark chips

References

  • University of California: Almond Tree Planting
  • Utah State University: Almonds, Filberts, Walnuts Grow Well In Utah's Climate
  • Utah Division Of Wildlife Services: Minimizing Browsing Damage By Deer

Who Can Help

  • Universiy of Georgia: Almond
Keywords: utah almond trees, planting almond tree, growing almond trees

About this Author

Kimberly Sharpe is a freelance writer with a diverse background. She has worked as a Web writer for the past four years. She writes extensively for Associated Content where she is both a featured home improvement contributor (with special emphasis on gardening) and a parenting contributor. She also writes for Helium. She has worked professionally in the animal care and gardening fields.