How Do I Know If I Have a Mole in My Yard?

Overview

A network of raised tunnels just under the surface of the soil is your first indication of a mole problem. Follow the raised tunnels to see where they lead and you may find additional evidence that furry critters are living in your landscaped areas. Because of the damage moles can do to plants, most homeowners seek to eradicate moles when they discover them.

Step 1

Examine your lawn and other planting areas for evidence of moles. Moles characteristically create a network of raised tunnels snaking in and through a landscape area. In fact, according to the North Carolina State University Extension website, moles are capable of tunneling as far as 15 feet per hour. With these tunneling capabilities, moles can quickly create an extensive network of tunnels throughout a gardener's landscape.

Step 2

Look carefully at the entrance areas of the raised tunnels. If you see a soil mound that resembles a volcano (a coned molehill), this indicates a mole is responsible for the landscape damage. If you see a soil mound that looks like a mine dump and the soil is off to an edge of the tunnel entrance, this indicates a gopher is responsible for the landscape damage.

Step 3

Step your foot down onto one of the raised tunnels. If it is a mole tunnel, as you press your weight down on the tunnel, it will return to soil level. This is because moles make these temporary tunnels just under the surface of the soil as they travel looking for food. Moles also have deeper tunnels between 1 and 2 feet beneath the soil, and the temporary raised tunnels connect with the deeper tunnels.

References

  • North Carolina State University Extension: Voles and Moles
  • Spring Green: Moles and Lawn Care
Keywords: mole problem, raised tunnels, eradicate moles

About this Author

Kathryn Hatter is a 42-year-old veteran homeschool educator and regular contributor to Natural News. She is an accomplished gardener, seamstress, quilter, painter, cook, decorator, digital graphics creator and she enjoys technical and computer gadgets. She began writing for Internet publications in 2007. She is interested in natural health and hopes to continue her formal education in the health field (nursing) when family commitments will allow.