How to Care for a Lamb's Ear Plant

Overview

Lamb's ear plants are native to Turkey and Iran, but can be found growing in gardens all around the world. They are generally planted as a ground cover and are well loved for their soft foliage and the pleasant aroma of their crushed leaves. Lamb's ear is also classified as an herb and was once used to help heal wounds. This plant is very drought tolerant and thrives easily when provided with the proper growing conditions.

Step 1

Choose the right location in your garden to plant lamb's ear. These plants do best when they receive full sun the majority of the day. It is also very important to provide them with soil that is fast draining because too much moisture can quickly kill them.

Step 2

Dig a hole that is the same depth as the container the plants were in when you purchased them. Space each planting hole 18 inches apart.

Step 3

Mix two handfuls of sand with the loosened soil. Work in one handful of controlled-release fertilizer and 1/2 cup pelleted limestone to the soil of each planting hole. Carefully place the lamb's ear into the hole and replace the dirt around it, patting it down firmly to remove any air bubbles.

Step 4

Water until the soil is moist, but not completely saturated. Continue to water this way whenever the top 3 inches of soil feels dry.

Step 5

Check the plants regularly for signs of pest infestation. Snails and slugs can damage lamb's ear quickly, so you should put out slug baits at the first sign of a problem. Destroy any of these pests that you find on or near the plants.

Step 6

Prune lamb's ear all the way to the ground a few weeks before the first frost is expected in your area.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden spade
  • Sand
  • Controlled-release fertilizer
  • Pelleted limestone
  • Pruning shears

References

  • North Carolina State University: Lamb's Ear
  • Mountain Valley Growers: Stachys lanata
  • Denver Plants: Lamb's Ear
  • "The Carolina Gardener's Guide"; Toby Boost, Jim Wilson; 2005
Keywords: lamb's ear, ground cover, stachys lanata, plant

About this Author

Annita Lawson has been working as a freelance writer since 2004. Her work has been published in various web and print outlets, including The Dabbling Mum, A Virtuous Woman, and Pediatrics for Parents. Lawson is pursuing an Associate of Arts degree at Southeast Kentucky Community College. She enjoys sharing all that she has learned about parenting, healthy eating and living a frugal lifestyle.