How to Plant a Compact Burning Bush

Overview

Burning bush, native to Japan, is named for its fiery red foliage in the fall. The compact burning bush grows smaller than the standard variety although it can still grow up to 10 feet tall and wide. A smaller cultivar called "Rudy Haag" only grows to 3 to 5 feet high and wide. This deciduous shrub is hardy in USDA planting zones 4 through 9.

Step 1

Choose a location that has full sun to partial shade. The bush does well in shade, but its red coloring in the fall will be deeper with more sun. Shaded plants tend to be on the pink side. The chosen area should be high enough that water does not pool after a heavy rain.

Step 2

Dig a hole the same depth but twice the width of the root ball. Clean the soil from all lawn grass, weeds and stones. Amend the dug-out soil to a ratio of two parts soil to one part compost.

Step 3

Carefully remove the bush from the container you purchased it in or remove the burlap from the root ball. If the roots were wrapped in burlap, soak them in a bucket of water for an hour before planting.

Step 4

Place the roots in the planting hole and fill the hole halfway with the amended soil. Water the soil to settle it around the roots.

Step 5

Continue to fill the hole with amended soil until the soil is level with the surrounding ground. Hand tamp the soil down firmly around the trunk of the plant.

Step 6

Apply a general purpose fertilizer once you start to see growth on the bush and again each spring. Follow the manufacturer's directions on the amount to apply.

Things You'll Need

  • Gardening gloves
  • Shovel
  • Compost
  • General purpose fertilizer

References

  • Natorp's: Compact Burning Bush: Great Fall Color
  • Ohio Department of Natural Resources: Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus)
  • Monrovia: Cole's Compact Burning Bush
Keywords: planting shrubs, compact burning bush, red dwarf shrubs

About this Author

Dale DeVries is a retired realtor with 30 years of experience in almost every facet of the business. DeVries started writing in 1990 when she wrote advertising and training manuals for her real estate agents. Since retiring, she has spent the last two years writing well over a thousand articles online for Associated Content, Bright Hub and Demand Studios.