How to Remove Strawberry Seeds

Overview

If you are a gardener and want to try your hand at growing strawberries, you need not go out and spend money on strawberry seeds. Instead, remove seeds from strawberries you already have and use them to start your crop. It is important to note that if the strawberries you have are from hybrid plants, you will not necessarily have success with growing another good crop. Hybrid plants are designed to not be able to sow themselves from their own seed. Use strawberries from an organic store or farmer's market for a better chance of successful plants. Removing seeds from strawberry plants for next year's harvest can be done in just a few steps.

Step 1

Select five, large healthy strawberries and cut off the green tops.

Step 2

Place the strawberries, whole, in a blender and add 4 cups of water.

Step 3

Blend the strawberries for 10 seconds. During the blending process, the viable seeds will sink to the bottom of the blender, and the seeds that are no good will go to the top.

Step 4

Pour out the water, pulp and top floating seeds.

Step 5

Pour the viable seeds into a sieve. Your sieve needs to be made of a very fine mesh weave, so the strawberry seeds will not be able to pass through the fibers. Run water over the seeds to rinse them.

Step 6

Transfer the seeds to a paper plate, and spread them out in a thin layer for drying. You will know the seeds are dry when they roll around the plate and are no longer sticking together.

Tips and Warnings

  • If you put the seeds away when they are still moist, it can cause them to mold and decay.

Things You'll Need

  • Healthy strawberries
  • Blender
  • Fine mesh sieve
  • Paper plate

References

  • Garden of Eaden: How To Collect And Prepare Strawberry Seeds For Propagation
  • The Small Farm Resource: How Do You Get Seeds From Strawberries
  • Texas A&M University Extension: Hybrid Varieties and Sowing Seed

Who Can Help

  • HobbyFarms.com: Strawberry Fields
Keywords: removing seeds from strawberries, harvesting strawberry seeds, saving strawberry seeds

About this Author

A freelance writer for more than 12 years, Traci Vandermark has written extensively on health and fitness topics. She is a student of health, fitness and nutrition at the International Institute Of Holistic Healing, certified by the American Association of Nutritional Consultants. Her articles have appeared in Catskill Country Magazine, The Lookout Magazine, Capper's, Birds and Blooms and Country Discoveries, to name a few.