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How to Kill Quack Grass

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How to Kill Quack Grass

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Overview

Quack grass is a perennial grass commonly considered to be a weed. Its main characteristic is its robust nature, making it difficult to remove from a lawn. It's Latin name, Agropyron repens, means literally "sudden field of fire," an allusion to its ability to rapidly consume an entire lawn. Quack grass is found in all states except for Hawaii, Arizona and Florida. Quack grass grows from rhizomes buried in the earth which produce thin, flat blades of grass which can reach 1 to 4 feet if left un-mowed. Control is difficult, but possible.

Step 1

Apply nitrogen fertilizer to the quack grass to promote the growth of dormant buds in the grass. This will prevent grow back once herbicide is applied.

Step 2

Spray the quack grass with an herbicide containing glyphosate using a spray wand and pump. Apply herbicide directly to the grass.

Step 3

Repeat application of the herbicide every 30 to 45 days until the quack grass dies away.

Step 4

Cover areas of dead quack grass with mulch to suffocate any remaining living grass and prevent new growth.

Tips and Warnings

  • Herbicide containing glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide, meaning it will kill any plant it comes in contact with. Spray directly onto the quack grass. Spray when the wind is less than five miles per hour in any direction to prevent the herbicide from spreading.

Things You'll Need

  • Nitrogen fertilizer
  • Herbicide containing glyphosate
  • Herbicide pump
  • Mulch

References

  • University of Montana: Quackgrass
  • Cheyenne Botanic Gardens: There's a Quack Lurking in Your Lawn
  • University of Minnesota: Controlling Quackgrass in Gardens
Keywords: quack grass, quack grass control, kill quack grass

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.

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