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Planting on Moon Cycles

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Planting on Moon Cycles

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Overview

Planting by the moon cycle is an ancient custom that has not changed over the years. Talk to any old farmer and they will tell you that either they do it or their parent's before them did. Again, gaining in popularity, using the phase of the moon to plant a garden is a creative way to plant your flower or vegetable garden.

Step 1

Transplant or plant seeds that have seeds outside the fruit itself, such as strawberries, blackberries or corn, between the New moon and the 1st quarter moon.

Step 2

Plant vegetable seeds or transplant seedlings that have seed contained inside the mature fruit, such as tomatoes, beans and squashe, between the 1st quarter of the moon and the full moon.

Step 3

Plant all root crops, such as potatoes, garlic and onions, and bulbs such as lilies and daffodils, during the period between the Full moon and the 3rd quarter.

Step 4

Do not plant any crops or flowers during the final quarter of the moon. The 3rd quarter of the moon cycle is reserved for harvesting fruits and vegetables, as it is believed they will keep longer.

Step 5

Use the approximate three-day period of the dark of the moon to pull weeds, till or other garden tasks.

Things You'll Need

  • Calendar showing moon phases

References

  • University of Florida: Astrological Gardening - Planting by the Moon and Signs
  • Cornell University: Does lunar gardening really work?
  • National Geographic: Age-Old Moon Gardening Growing in Popularity

Who Can Help

  • Gardening by the Moon
Keywords: moon phase gardening, gardening by the moon, garden by the moon phase

About this Author

G. K. Bayne is a freelance writer, currently writing for Demand Studios where her expertise in back-to-basics, computers and electrical equipment are the basis of her body of work. Bayne began her writing career in 1975 and has written for Demand since 2007.