How to Plant a Kiwi

Overview

Kiwis are known to be warm-weather fruits, but in actuality, the fuzzy varieties are hardy to USDA hardiness zone 7, and other non-fuzzy varieties, such as Kolomikta, are hardy all the way to USDA zone 3. Plan to plant your kiwi vines in the spring after the last frost.

Step 1

Select a site for planting. It should be in full sun and in an area free from high winds. If possible, plant kiwi vines on a slight slope so any cold air will settle toward the bottom of the slope. It will also improve water drainage. Kiwi vines also need to be planted next to support, such as a fence, trellis, arbor or pergola.

Step 2

Till the soil about 12 inches deep and mix in about 3 to 4 inches of compost. If this is a new planting site where the soil has never been treated before, mix in a slow releasing all-purpose fertilizer. Follow the dosing instructions on the label because each fertilizer has different potencies.

Step 3

Plant the female kiwis about 15 feet apart; however, some varieties (e.g., Artic Beauty, Kolomikta) can be planted closer together. One male vine--which does not produce fruit--will be needed for every six to eight female vines for pollination and should be planted about 50 feet from the female vines. Plant the vines to the same depth as they were planted in the container.

Step 4

Water the kiwi vines with about an inch of water and keep the ground moist for the first growing season when their roots are shallow.

Things You'll Need

  • Rototiller or hoe
  • Compost
  • Fertilizer
  • Water

References

  • National Gardening Association: Edible Landscaping--Kiwis
  • Rain Tree Nursery: Kiwis
Keywords: plant kiwi tree, plant kiwi vine, grow kiwis

About this Author

Melissa Lewis has been a professional writer since 2005. Her work has appeared in various online publications. A former elementary classroom teacher and media specialist, Lewis is also a script writer, with a movie script, "Homecoming," she co-wrote currently in production. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology.