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How to Water Coconut Husk Hanging Baskets

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How to Water Coconut Husk Hanging Baskets

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Overview

Coconut fiber, sometimes known as coir or coco, can be shaped into a liner for wire-frame hanging basket planters. The porous material offers superior soil drainage and airflow to the roots, although this comes with a price: the extra airflow and drainage allows soil to dry out faster in arid climates. Some coconut fiber basket liners come with a sheet of perforated, impermeable material sandwiched between to layers of coco fiber. This helps reduce the problem of quick drying while still allowing water and air to flow through.

Step 1

Lightly touch the surface of the hanging basket's soil. It should be watered only when dry to the touch. If your plants are starting to wilt, you've delayed for too long and should water immediately.

Step 2

Turn your garden hose on to a medium flow of water, strong enough to quickly saturate the soil in the hanging basket, but not so strong that it will flush the soil out of the basket.

Step 3

Place the end of the hose in the top of the hanging basket. Leave it in place until water starts to drip out of the bottom of the basket.

Step 4

Remove the hose from the basket. Feel around on the surface of the soil and also on the outside of the basket. If you find any spots that are much drier than the rest of the soil or coconut husk material, place the hose in the top of the basket near the dry place, and water until the soil is uniformly moist.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden hose

References

  • University of Illinois Extension: Container Gardening
  • Proven Winners: Hope for Hanging Baskets
Keywords: coconut fiber, coconut husk, coir, coco, hanging baskets

About this Author

Marie Mulrooney has written professionally since 2001. Her diverse background includes numerous outdoor pursuits, personal training and linguistics. She studied mathematics at the University of Alaska Anchorage and contributes regularly to various online publications. Print publication credits include national magazines, poetry awards and long-lived columns about local outdoor adventures.

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