Flowering Drought Resistant Shrubs

Selecting drought resistant shrubs when landscaping your yard or garden will reduce the amount of water needed for irrigation. Many drought resistant shrubs produce flowers, allowing you to add color to your garden while saving water. Some flowering plants naturally attract hummingbirds and others make suitable trees, if properly pruned.

Superstition Mallow

The Superstition mallow (Abutilon palmeri) has orange-yellow flower blossoms that bloom from spring to fall, and silver-green evergreen foliage. It is a native to Mexico, the Sonoran region and Arizona, and enjoys full or partial sun exposure. It will grow to about four feet high when mature and produces a minimal amount of litter from its shedding.

Bee Brush

The bee brush (Aloysia gratissima) has scented flowers that range in color from white to pale purple and attracts butterflies. Bee brush is a semi-evergreen and its flowers bloom from spring to fall. It will grow to about six feet tall to six feet wide at maturity and enjoys full sun. Native to South America and the Chihuahuan Desert, the plant generates a moderate amount of litter from shedding.

Flame Honeysuckle

The Flame Honeysuckle (Anisacanthus quadrifidus v. wrightii) attracts both butterflies and hummingbirds with its orange-red flowers that bloom from summer to late fall. It will grow to about three feet high to four feet wide at maturity and produces a minimal amount of litter from its shedding. The Flame Honeysuckle enjoys full sun and is native to the Chihuahuan Desert.

Barberry

The Barberry (Berberis trifoliolat)'s red berries attract birds. The Barberry is a round-shaped, evergreen shrub that will grow to about five feet tall and five feet wide at maturity. A native of the Chihuahuan Desert, its yellow flowers bloom from late winter to spring. It enjoys full sun and produces a minimal amount of litter.

Wooly Butterfly Bush

The wooly butterfly bush (Buddleia marrubifolia) attracts butterflies. It is an evergreen with orange flowers that bloom from spring to mid-summer. At maturity, it will reach approximately five feet high by five feet wide and has silver-colored foliage. Another native of the Chihuahuan Desert, the wooly butterfly bush does well in reflected or full sun.

Mexican Bird of Paradise

The Mexican Bird of Paradise, or Caesalpinia Mexicana, attracts hummingbirds and can be grown as a small tree. Its yellow flower spikes bloom from spring to fall and its foliage is a fine textured evergreen. Native to Mexico, the Mexican Bird of Paradise enjoys full sun, can grow up to 15 feet high and produces a moderate amount of litter from its shedding.

Keywords: drought resistant shrub, low water use shrub, flowering desert shrub

About this Author

Ann Johnson was the editor of a community magazine in Southern California for more than 10 years and was an active real estate agent, specializing in commercial and residential properties. She has a Bachelors of Art degree in communications from California State University of Fullerton. Today she is a freelance writer and photographer, and part owner of an Arizona real estate company.